Posts tagged “Sony

Google TV Review

At this point there are more cord-cutters than ever and there are now more options of retrieving media via the web.  With options such as Roku, Boxee, Apple TV and others what makes a device with Google TV installed so special? There are two basic avenues to getting Google TV, either you can purchase a TV with it installed or you can get a set top box with it installed and hook it up to a non-internet enabled TV.

Typically the Google TV experience that I have seen and witnessed is pretty vanilla and straight-forward.  The latest devices are running Android 3.2 and hopefully will be seeing an update soon.

Setup.  Setup of Google TV is simple, just as easy as you would setup a new Android device with signing in to your Google account and restoring apps — this is no different.  In addition, Google TV not only works alone, it works with your existing cable connection and HDTV.  That is right.  Not only can you benefit from just having this set top box alone, which is a viable option, adding cable just makes your experience better by actually being able to search content from your service provider, searching and still watching your favorite shows using PIP and more.

Day-to-Day Usage.  Using this player is just like using a Roku or Boxee Box device; however, the caveat is that these devices lack a customizable operating system beneath or “flow” from one to another; plus there is no full-featured Google Chrome.  Google TV devices come with the Google Play Store, which allows you to download any app compatible to your device.  That is includes Netflix, Flixster, YouTube (more on that later) and more.  Android on a TV is unlike anything that you’ve ever experienced — simply amazing.  Not only is the transition from app to app fluid and simple, the controls on the remote mimic Android on mobile devices, as they should. google-tv-remote

Apps.  To start, there are over 700K apps available on the Google Play Store for your devices; however, for this device, there are only a few thousand available.  Now, it is arguable how many apps do you really need for a TV?  Mainly, you need media consumption apps — not Cut the Rope or Angry Birds.  The apps that are available make this an extremely functional device and once you have it in your living room it’ll be there to stay.  YouTube on the Google TV is simply put, the richest YouTube experience on a TV – period. YT_GoogleTVFrom the ability to stream every video in your subscription box, the user has full control to give ratings and also view video information; all in excellent HD resoltion.  Netflix is no slacker here either — the UI is far greater than the experience on the Roku player.  It is not like the content increases, but the manner in which Netflix for Google TV delivers it is the key.  Also, Google Play Music and Movies are available, which just makes this box even more “Googley” so all of that music that you have uploaded and those movies that you have purchased are at your fingertips for the first time on your TV.

Just the above four apps alone make this device worth the $175 that you can purchase it for; Target even had it for $129.

Bottom line:  If you are a Google-centric person a Google TV is a no-brainer, especially the model I chose — Sony NSZ-GS7 Internet Player with Google TV — buy [HERE]

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Sony against Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich

The marvel of the Android world as of right now is Android 4.0; users and critics alike love it because of it’s elegant design, fluidity, and speed.  On the other hand, there is one company that does not seem to be convinced.

Sony.

On the Sony developer blog [HERE] there is a list of reasons outlined explaining why users would not want to upgrade to the latest version of Google’s mobile operating system.  Sony even tried to point the finger and the browser stating that it is “quite intensive”.  Read entire story [HERE].  Is it the fault of Google that Ice Cream Sandwich is not performing well or is it the fault of manufacturers such as Sony that consistently adds widgets, themes, apps, and more to the experience that eventually cause more harm than good?

Bottom line:  It is remarkable how manufacturers try to “fix” and “mold” Android for their newly released devices but never put forth that same effort when an update is released to make sure that it works just the same.  This really makes one wonder….is it really Google’s fault that Android fragmentation exists?